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There is nothing wrong with brands celebrating holidays, but when you are celebrating holidays simply because they exist, it’s time to re-consider your marketing strategy. Father’s Day has just gone by, and obviously your social media manager was scrambling around to find a cheesy image of a father and a son walking on the beach. Your brand makes knitting needles, so it went something like “Fathers are what make a close knit family”. Cute. But how many consumers see that on their feed and want to go out and buy your knitting needles? Lets take this further, you are a consumer and for whatever reason you enjoy crocheting (that’s a kind of knitting right?) so you see this post and what do you think? Im guessing you are just bored by the 2861763162316 father’s day posts you have already seen on your feed, or if you do engage with it, it just feels kind of flat. That indifference is because you know intrinsically that it is being done, just because. It means nothing. It stands for nothing. All it means is you have less data now. SEE SOME CAUTIONARY TALES HERE: http://www.inc.com/will-yakowicz/the-top-social-media-fails-2015.html So how do you create the kind of content that capitalises on

What we want Experience - first and foremost. A Social Media Manager who can plan, execute and nurture brand relationships across various social platforms for an array of Apex Media clients, working in a cross-functional team. Who you are A specialist. Seriously. We’re a team of T-shaped storytellers and communicators, who shift between the content, creative and strategic space. We’re looking for someone to dip in and share strategic recommendations, but whose POV is focused on social media, paid and analytics - with an eye to campaigns and the long-term commitment of community management. You must have experience working in a digital agency or editorial space, and must be proficient in the paid/online advertising space (Twitter, Facebook, Ad Words and YouTube). What you will do Work independently and with the content and creative team Develop social media strategy, editorial planning and calendars alongside the content team for roll out on social media across a range of campaigns and clients Plan and buy Twitter, Facebook and YouTube ads Build and maintain relationships with key influencers, manage as required in a long-term or on a campaigns basis Launch and maintain brand presences on key social media platforms as and when required Co-develop content ideas for social channels Monitor, analyse, manage and report on

There’s a nasty rumor going around that WordPress is beautifully set up for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) “out of the box.” Now don’t get me wrong - I’m a huge fan of WordPress - but the core software does need a little nudge in the right direction when it comes to SEO. Tom Ewer from ManageWP. There’s a nasty rumor going around that WordPress is beautifully set up for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) “out of the box.” Now don’t get me wrong - I’m a huge fan of WordPress - but the core software does need a little nudge in the right direction when it comes to SEO. Tom Ewer from ManageWP. In reality, if your idea of optimizing your WordPress stops at hitting Publish on your latest post, you’re missing out on a lot of potential. But even those of you who feel that you are doing quite a lot in terms of onsite optimization are probably making at least one of the following mistakes (I know I certainly have done in the past). So take a few moments to digest the following common SEO mistakes made by WordPress users - I’ll be offering straightforward solutions to each one! 1) Not Providing an

Any good marketing conference has at least one compelling keynote speaker that offers sage, relevant counsel to the crowd. The key ingredient here is relevancy. We crave new thinking, but we also seek application of that thinking to our own lives. Deanna Lazzaroni reports on LinkedIn Marketing When I tell you that Oscar-winning actor Kevin Spacey presented recently at a marketing conference — no, the largest content marketing conference — you may question the relevancy of his keynote address to such a crowd. I did. He did, in fact, asking himself this very question as he opened his presentation at Content Marketing World last week. What followed I believe deserves a content marketing award. In Kevin Spacey’s mind, the connection between his world and ours as marketers is the fact that we all have audiences, and those audiences demand great stories. It is our job to tell stories, better stories, and to do so by incorporating three main ingredients. The Simple, Yet Powerful Ingredients of a Truly Great Story Simply put, Spacey explained that what makes a great story is conflict, authenticity and, most importantly, the audience itself. He went on to detail how each ingredient played a pivotal part in the narrative, providing relevant examples

Content marketing plays a mission critical role in the growth story of a business, Pratik Dholakiya investigates, With survey after survey reporting companies will spend more on content marketing than ever before, content marketers need to pull out all the stops to ensure this tactic delivers solid ROI. There is just one problem, though. Not all content marketing strategies work and content marketers have only themselves to blame. If a content marketing campaign doesn’t deliver results, it means the people in charge have made a hash of it. Why do some campaigns fail, while others score? What do successful content marketers do differently? The popular perception is that their skill sets and proficiency make the difference but, more than that, it is their attitude and approach. Two campaigns using similar tactics can throw up contrasting results purely because content marketers behind the really profitable campaign view the same tactic through different eyes. Successful content marketers do five things differently: 1. They respect content. I know you might be thinking, “Respect! I mean c’mon, where does respect enter the picture?” But that’s what the truly astute marketers do. They respect the potential content has to build brand reputation. They are extremely selective about content. Before content is pushed out, they thoroughly evaluate the potential for

HBO television host and Daily Show alum John Oliver took some pointed shots at brands on Twitter this Sunday, criticizing several specific brands, and Corporate America in general, for trying to cash in on touchy trending topics. Kevin Shively explores this topic futher. It’s become common practice for brand marketers on Twitter to “newsjack” popular topics and hashtags, cashing in on the influx of traffic, even when it isn’t appropriate. Oliver condemned this type of marketing, calling for more responsibility from brands, telling corporations that Twitter is “a cocktail party” and that they don’t belong there, so they should act responsibly. He even provided a “pledge” for brands who agreed with his sentiment. You can watch the video clip here. Please note excessive swearing and controversial content. That was Oliver’s point. There are many ways to engage and grow your audience on Twitter. Trying to leverage these more serious conversations has more potential to backfire than the good it presents. Look companies, your silence is never going to be controversial. No one will ever go, ‘I can’t believe it. Skittles didn’t tweet about 9-11 yesterday, they must support terrorism. I’m never eating them again.’ -   John Oliver, Last Week Tonight What Oliver’s Segment Can Teach Us It would be easy

Jodi Harris from Content Marketing Institute looks at a couple of inspiring visual content that just hit the target with their campaigns. Over the last several weeks, we’ve had a chance to get recommendations on a lot of aspects of the content marketing process — from ways to find great content creators (both internally and externally), to the latest tools and techniques for executing on and measuring the impact of a content marketing strategy, to ways to infuse content with a higher purpose. But successful content marketing doesn’t just involve writing and technology decisions. The images that go along with a story work just as hard to convey your business’s value and message. In fact, as videos, infographics, and photo-centric social networks like Instagram and Pinterest continue to gain favour, visual content is increasingly being leveraged to engage and inform an audience in uniquely compelling ways. For the last collaborative post in our latest series, we asked our panel of CMI blog contributors, Online Training instructors, and Content Marketing World speakers for their answers to the question, “What’s the most innovative or interesting example you’ve seen of visual content marketing?” Following are some of the efforts that stood out in their minds: The infographic

Consumers demand multiple sharing options One of the biggest oversights brands make is offering only Facebook and Twitter sharing options, assuming consumers only want to share content or products on the largest social sites. In reality, today’s audiences are continuing to shift to new social networks, fragmenting their social and web activity across multiple channels. By offering only major social sharing buttons, brands dramatically limit new user acquisition and page views. Our data — based on access to share and click-back data for hundreds of thousands of websites — indicate that websites giving users a minimum of five choices generate the largest volume of sharing. Less mainstream share buttons such as email, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Google+ (among others) are still effective in drawing in a larger audience. And using a third-party sharing widget that consolidates multiple sharing channels into one JavaScript tag is a smart choice to simultaneously limit downward drag on page load time and increase sharing of your content. Don’t leave valuable click-backs (i.e., free users!) on the table. Let your users promote the value of your content Another content optimization technique is including counters to show share volumes. You can display one universal counter that tallies all of your shares across

1. Take “best of breed” seriously Ninety-nine percent of companies don’t do this. In my third book, Epic Content Marketing, I talk about six principles that are essential to epic content marketing. The sixth, and perhaps most important, is setting a goal/mission to be the “best of breed” informational provider for your industry niche — i.e., to truly be the leading informational resource for your industry. This is critical to making content marketing work for you. If your content marketing isn’t eagerly anticipated and truly necessary, at some point, your audience will see through the façade and ignore you. Ask yourself this: If your content marketing disappeared from the planet, would anyone miss it? If no one would miss your information, you’ve got work to do. Start by setting your goal, then set up the processes and invest in the people you need to reach that goal. 2. Go 6 months without mentioning your product When I was doing research for the book, I compared CMI’s informational/educational posts to posts that mentioned our products and/or services. The posts that talked about us received about 25 percent of the total unique visitors that a regular, educational post did. At the same time, we received virtually no additional

Professor Kotler concluded the book with a section called “Transformational Marketing,” in which he discussed how the field would change with the “new age of electronic marketing.” In the coming decade, Kotler wrote, “marketing will be re-engineered from A to Z. Marketing will need to rethink fundamentally the processes by which they identify, communicate, and deliver customer value.” There’s only one problem: Fifteen years have passed, and this vital transformation hasn’t happened yet. Consumers have changed, marketing operations haven’t In case you haven’t noticed, almost every marketing conference you attend these days starts with the same four or five requisite slides. Consumers are now empowered by digital technology… they are becoming more aware… they are researching, engaging, buying, and staying loyal to brands in ways that have fundamentally changed… Yes, we get it. Consumer behavior in the age of the social and mobile web is different than it was before. In fact, maybe it’s actually more accurate to say “is changing” and “will continue to fundamentally change,” as content’s continual evolution shows no sign of slowing. The challenge is that marketing operations in enterprise companies have largely remained just as they were when Kotler wrote his book — i.e., they are still working from mid-